Tag Archives: Campaigns

Guide to meeting with your county commissioner about 287(g)

We are asking AKIN friends and allies to meet with their county commissioners about 287(g). Following are some guidelines for your consideration.

First, set up your meeting:

1. Call or email your commissioner and ask for a meeting on 287(g)

  • Find contact info for commissioners here.
  • Don’t know your commissioner? Look here.

2. Identify 1-2 people who share your concerns and who will join you at this meeting (we can help with this)

Next, figure out your goals for the meeting (here are our suggestions):

Continue reading Guide to meeting with your county commissioner about 287(g)

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Knox County 287(g) MOA appears on ICE website

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Photo Credit: Ralph Hutchison

It is our great disappointment to inform you that a 287(g) memorandum of agreement (MOA) signed by Knox County and ICE has appeared on the ICE website.  You can read the MOA here.

In the absence of any explanation to the Knoxville community by either ICE or Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “JJ” Jones, we assume this means that the 287(g) program is going forward.

Continue reading Knox County 287(g) MOA appears on ICE website

What is 287(g) and why do we oppose it?

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Photo Credit: Meghan Conley

by Meghan Conley and Fran Ansley

What is 287(g)?

287(g) is a voluntary program through which state and local law enforcement agencies can choose to have their officers trained and deputized to act as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents. The program uses local resources to enforce federal immigration law.[i]

What is the history of 287(g) in Knox County?

Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “JJ” Jones first applied to join the 287(g) program in 2009. Immigrants’ rights advocates in Knoxville and beyond mounted a hard-fought campaign in opposition to the proposal, and federal authorities eventually denied the sheriff’s application in 2013. Many in Knox County remember Jones’ alarming and dehumanizing response to this rejection: “I will continue to enforce these federal immigration violations with or without the help of U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). If need be, I will stack these violators like cordwood in the Knox County Jail until the appropriate federal agency responds.” In February 2017, Jones renewed his application. Local state and national groups have objected. ICE has not yet announced a decision. Update: We recently learned that a signed memorandum of agreement (MOA) between ICE and Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “JJ” Jones has appeared on the ICE website.  For more information, click here.

Continue reading What is 287(g) and why do we oppose it?

287(g) Community Briefing

Update: We recently learned that a signed memorandum of agreement (MOA) between ICE and Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “JJ” Jones has appeared on the ICE website.  For more information, click here.

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Photo Credit: Meghan Conley

Please join us for a community briefing to learn more about Knox County’s recent application for 287(g).  The 287(g) program, which authorizes local police to act as immigration agents, has a proven track record of abuses and civil rights violations. 

We will discuss the current status of 287(g) in Knox County and what we have already done to fight back.  Please join us to learn how you can be involved.

What: 287(g) Community Briefing
When: Saturday, May 20, 2 – 4 pm
Where: St. James Episcopal Church

287(g) back in play!

Update: We recently learned that a signed memorandum of agreement (MOA) between ICE and Knox County Sheriff Jimmy “JJ” Jones has appeared on the ICE website.  For more information, click here.

Despite our previously successful efforts from 2012-2013 to prevent the implementation of 287(g) in Knox County, we are now in a new situation because the Trump administration intends to expand this program across the country.   AKIN learned recently that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is presently considering 287(g) applications from 18 counties across the country, including one from the Knox County Sheriff’s Office.

Background and some history

For those who are unfamiliar with this program, 287(g) encourages collaboration between ICE and local law enforcement.  If Knox County’s application for 287(g) is approved, county deputies who work in the jail will be trained as ICE officers and will be able to question inmates about their documentation status and initiate deportation proceedings against those who are found to be undocumented.  In effect, this program will increase the number of local officials involved in immigration enforcement.

Continue reading 287(g) back in play!